Andrew D. Klaber

Partner at Paulson & Co.

Andrew D. Klaber

Andrew D. Klaber

Partner at Paulson & Co.

Overview
Career Highlights

Orphans Against AIDS

RelSci Relationships

4757

Number of Boards

8

Number of Awards

3

Contact Data
Trying to get in touch with Andrew D. Klaber? Subscribe today to access their professional contact information and receive a one time promotion of free Contact Data credits!
Relationships
RelSci Relationships are individuals Andrew D. Klaber likely has professional access to. A relationship does not necessarily indicate a personal connection.

Chief Executive Officer, Co-Founder at Modern Meadow, Inc.

Relationship likelihood: Strong

Founder at Paulson & Co.

Relationship likelihood: Strong

Partner at Paulson & Co.

Relationship likelihood: Strong

Co-Founder at The Natan Fund

Relationship likelihood: Strong

Founder at The Natan Fund

Relationship likelihood: Strong

Co-Founder at Clarity Capital KCPS Ltd.

Relationship likelihood: Strong

Co-Chief Executive Officer at Silver Lake Management Co. LLC

Relationship likelihood: Strong

Editor-in-Chief at The Atlantic Magazine

Relationship likelihood: Strong

Principal Product Manager at Medtronic, Inc.

Relationship likelihood: Strong

Member, Executive Leadership Team at UJA-Federation of New York

Relationship likelihood: Strong

Paths to Andrew D. Klaber
Potential Connections via
Relationship Science
You
Andrew D. Klaber
Partner at Paulson & Co.
Education
BA-Ethics, Politics & Economics & International Studies

Yale University is an American private Ivy League research university located in New Haven, Connecticut. Founded in 1701 in the Colony of Connecticut, the university is the third-oldest institution of higher education in the United States.

Masters of Science Degree in Economic History

Oxford is a collegiate university, consisting of the central University and colleges. The central University is composed of academic departments and research centres, administrative departments, libraries and museums. The 38 colleges are self-governing and financially independent institutions, which are related to the central University in a federal system. There are also six permanent private halls, which were founded by different Christian denominations and which still retain their Christian character.

MBA, with Distinction

Harvard Business School (HBS) is the graduate business school of Harvard University in Boston, Massachusetts, United States. The school offers a large full-time MBA program, doctoral programs, and many executive education programs. It owns Harvard Business School Publishing, which publishes business books, leadership articles, online management tools for corporate learning, case studies, and the monthly Harvard Business Review.

Juris Doctor

Harvard Law School offers an energetic and creative learning environment, a diverse and dedicated faculty—whose expertise spans a broad array of legal subjects—and a student body that comes from every state in the U.S. and more than 70 countries around the world. Approximately 1,900 students attend HLS each year: 1,680 J.D. students, 160 LL.M. students, and 50 S.J.D. candidates. The faculty includes more than 100 full-time professors and more than 150 visiting professors, lecturers on law, and instructors. The curriculum features more than 260 courses and seminars that cover a broad range of traditional and emerging legal fields. A Harvard Law education prepares students for success in law practice, business, public service, teaching, and more. Most HLS students are pursuing a J.D. (Juris Doctor) degree, while many others are earning an LL.M. (Master of Laws) or the S.J.D. (Doctor of Juridical Science). Harvard Law School also offers many joint degree programs, coordinated programs, and concurrent degree opportunities with other schools within Harvard University. The Law School community is also home to numerous research programs and engaging publications, including books, scholarly periodicals, newsletters, and a weekly student newspaper.

Memberships
Term Member
Current

Council on Foreign Relations, Inc. provides and disseminates ideas on foreign policies to individuals, corporate members, journalists and policy makers. It operates a forum for government officials, students and other interested parties to study and discuss world issues and impact on American foreign policies. The company publishes Foreign Affairs, a magazine that comes out six times a year, along with books and studies by its own scholars. Council on Foreign Relations was founded in 1921 and is headquartered in New York City, NY.

Career History
Partner
2009 - Current

Paulson's investment strategies are all based on the same underlying investment philosophy of capital preservation and low correlation to the broad markets. They perform fundamental and legal analysis on investments, including reviews of company financials and review of legal documentation related to proposed investment opportunities. The firm's products are provided through collective investment vehicles, including both domestic partnerships and offshore private investment companies, and separately managed accounts that deploy all or a subset of the firm's investment strategies. Paulson's investment objective is to achieve positive excess returns through trading the securities and/or derivatives thereon of companies that are the subject of proposed changes in corporate structure or control such as tender offers, mergers, spin-offs, proxy contests, liquidations, recapitalizations, restructurings and bankruptcy reorganizations.

Founder
Current
Senior Chair, Wall Street & Financial Services Young Wall Street
Current

UJA-Federation of New York cares for those in need, rescues those in harm's way, and renews and strengthens the Jewish people in New York, in Israel, and around the world. Funds raised by UJA-Federation sustain the activities of health, human-service, educational, and community agencies. Every day, these community-based organizations provide a multitude of services that improve and enhance people's lives.

Boards & Committees
New York Regional Co-Chair of the Social Investment Council
Current

Echoing Green, Inc. provides seed funding and technical assistance to emerging social entrepreneurs with ideas for social change. The firm offers a fellowship program that provides seed funding to emerging social entrepreneurs; open society black male achievement fellowship, a program for improving the life outcomes of black men and boys in the United States through social entrepreneurship; and works on purpose, a career training program. The company was founded in 1987 and is headquartered in New York, NY.

President, Board of Directors
Current
Member, Advisory Board
Current

The mission of the Resolution Project is to develop socially-responsible young leaders and empower them to make a positive impact today.

Non-Profit Donations & Grants

Learn how non-profit organizations benefit from RelSci
$500 - $999
2012

A complex of buildings in the heart of New York City, The Morgan Library & Museum began as the private library of financier Pierpont Morgan (1837–1913), one of the preeminent collectors and cultural benefactors in the United States. As early as 1890 Morgan had begun to assemble a collection of illuminated, literary, and historical manuscripts, early printed books, and old master drawings and prints. Mr. Morgan's library, as it was known in his lifetime, was built between 1902 and 1906 adjacent to his New York residence at Madison Avenue and 36th Street. Designed by Charles McKim of the architectural firm McKim, Mead & White, the library was intended as something more than a repository of rare materials. Majestic in appearance yet intimate in scale, the structure was to reflect the nature and stature of its holdings. The result was an Italian Renaissance-style palazzo with three magnificent rooms epitomizing America's Age of Elegance. Completed three years before McKim's death, it is considered by many to be his masterpiece. In 1924, eleven years after Pierpont Morgan's death, his son, J. P. Morgan, Jr. (1867–1943), known as Jack, realized that the library had become too important to remain in private hands. In what constituted one of the most momentous cultural gifts in U.S. history, he fulfilled his father's dream of making the library and its treasures available to scholars and the public alike by transforming it into a public institution. Over the years—through purchases and generous gifts—The Morgan Library & Museum has continued to acquire rare materials as well as important music manuscripts, early children's books, Americana, and materials from the twentieth century. Without losing its decidedly domestic feeling, the Morgan also has expanded its physical space considerably. In 1928, the Annex building was erected on the corner of Madison Avenue and 36th Street, replacing Pierpont Morgan's residence. The Annex connected to the original McKim library by means of a gallery. In 1988, Jack Morgan's former residence—a mid-nineteenth century brownstone on Madison Avenue and 37th Street—also was added to the complex. The 1991 garden court was constructed as a means to unite the various elements of the Morgan campus. The largest expansion in the Morgan's history, adding 75,000 square feet to the campus, was completed in 2006. Designed by Pritzker Prize–winning architect Renzo Piano, the project increases exhibition space by more than fifty percent and adds important visitor amenities, including a new performance hall, a welcoming entrance on Madison Avenue, a new café and a new restaurant, a shop, a new reading room, and collections storage. Piano's design integrates the Morgan's three historical buildings with three new modestly scaled steel-and-glass pavilions. A soaring central court connects the buildings and serves as a gathering place for visitors in the spirit of an Italian piazza.

$500 - $999
2011

A complex of buildings in the heart of New York City, The Morgan Library & Museum began as the private library of financier Pierpont Morgan (1837–1913), one of the preeminent collectors and cultural benefactors in the United States. As early as 1890 Morgan had begun to assemble a collection of illuminated, literary, and historical manuscripts, early printed books, and old master drawings and prints. Mr. Morgan's library, as it was known in his lifetime, was built between 1902 and 1906 adjacent to his New York residence at Madison Avenue and 36th Street. Designed by Charles McKim of the architectural firm McKim, Mead & White, the library was intended as something more than a repository of rare materials. Majestic in appearance yet intimate in scale, the structure was to reflect the nature and stature of its holdings. The result was an Italian Renaissance-style palazzo with three magnificent rooms epitomizing America's Age of Elegance. Completed three years before McKim's death, it is considered by many to be his masterpiece. In 1924, eleven years after Pierpont Morgan's death, his son, J. P. Morgan, Jr. (1867–1943), known as Jack, realized that the library had become too important to remain in private hands. In what constituted one of the most momentous cultural gifts in U.S. history, he fulfilled his father's dream of making the library and its treasures available to scholars and the public alike by transforming it into a public institution. Over the years—through purchases and generous gifts—The Morgan Library & Museum has continued to acquire rare materials as well as important music manuscripts, early children's books, Americana, and materials from the twentieth century. Without losing its decidedly domestic feeling, the Morgan also has expanded its physical space considerably. In 1928, the Annex building was erected on the corner of Madison Avenue and 36th Street, replacing Pierpont Morgan's residence. The Annex connected to the original McKim library by means of a gallery. In 1988, Jack Morgan's former residence—a mid-nineteenth century brownstone on Madison Avenue and 37th Street—also was added to the complex. The 1991 garden court was constructed as a means to unite the various elements of the Morgan campus. The largest expansion in the Morgan's history, adding 75,000 square feet to the campus, was completed in 2006. Designed by Pritzker Prize–winning architect Renzo Piano, the project increases exhibition space by more than fifty percent and adds important visitor amenities, including a new performance hall, a welcoming entrance on Madison Avenue, a new café and a new restaurant, a shop, a new reading room, and collections storage. Piano's design integrates the Morgan's three historical buildings with three new modestly scaled steel-and-glass pavilions. A soaring central court connects the buildings and serves as a gathering place for visitors in the spirit of an Italian piazza.

Awards & Honors
Goldman Sachs Global Leader
Oxford University - Marshall Scholar
Truman Scholar
This web site is not endorsed by, directly affiliated with, maintained, authorized, or sponsored by Andrew D. Klaber. The use of any trade name or trademark is for identification and reference purposes only and does not imply any association with the trademark holder. The Presence of Andrew D. Klaber's profile does not indicate a business or promotional relationship of any kind between RelSci and Andrew D. Klaber.