Bob Anthony

Commissioner at Oklahoma Corporation Commission

Bob Anthony

Bob Anthony

Commissioner at Oklahoma Corporation Commission

Overview
Career Highlights

C. R. Anthony Co.

RelSci Relationships

486

Number of Boards

1

Contact Data
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Relationships
RelSci Relationships are individuals Bob Anthony likely has professional access to. A relationship does not necessarily indicate a personal connection.

Commissioner at Oklahoma Corporation Commission

Relationship likelihood: Strong

President at Fernwood Advisors, Inc. (Massachusetts)

Relationship likelihood: Strong

Commissioner at Oklahoma Corporation Commission

Relationship likelihood: Strong

Former Vice President, Natural Gas Marketing at Continental Resources, Inc.

Relationship likelihood: Strong

Chairman, President & Chief Executive Officer at Watts Consulting Group, Inc.

Relationship likelihood: Strong

Member, Storage Tank Advisory Council at Oklahoma Corporation Commission

Relationship likelihood: Average

Member, Storage Tank Advisory Council at Oklahoma Corporation Commission

Relationship likelihood: Average

Member, Storage Tank Advisory Council at Oklahoma Corporation Commission

Relationship likelihood: Average

Chief of Staff at The Library of Congress

Relationship likelihood: Weak

Former Assistant General Counsel at The Library of Congress

Relationship likelihood: Weak

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Bob Anthony
Commissioner at Oklahoma Corporation Commission
Family Members
Memberships
Career History
Captain
Prior

The Army Reserve's mission, under Title 10 of the U.S. Code, is to provide trained, equipped and ready Soldiers and cohesive units to meet the global requirements across the full spectrum of operations. The Army Reserve is a key element in The Army multi-component unit force, training with Active and National Guard units to ensure all three components work as a fully integrated team.

Councilmember
1979 - 1980
Consultant
1976 - Prior

The Library of Congress was established by an act of Congress in 1800 when President John Adams signed a bill providing for the transfer of the seat of government from Philadelphia to the new capital city of Washington. The legislation described a reference library for Congress only, containing "such books as may be necessary for the use of Congress - and for putting up a suitable apartment for containing them therein…" Established with $5,000 appropriated by the legislation, the original library was housed in the new Capitol until August 1814, when invading British troops set fire to the Capitol Building, burning and pillaging the contents of the small library. Within a month, retired President Thomas Jefferson offered his personal library as a replacement. Jefferson had spent 50 years accumulating books, "putting by everything which related to America, and indeed whatever was rare and valuable in every science"; his library was considered to be one of the finest in the United States. In offering his collection to Congress, Jefferson anticipated controversy over the nature of his collection, which included books in foreign languages and volumes of philosophy, science, literature, and other topics not normally viewed as part of a legislative library. He wrote, "I do not know that it contains any branch of science which Congress would wish to exclude from their collection; there is, in fact, no subject to which a Member of Congress may not have occasion to refer." In January 1815, Congress accepted Jefferson's offer, appropriating $23,950 for his 6,487 books, and the foundation was laid for a great national library. The Jeffersonian concept of universality, the belief that all subjects are important to the library of the American legislature, is the philosophy and rationale behind the comprehensive collecting policies of today's Library of Congress. Ainsworth Rand Spofford, Librarian of Congress from 1864 to 1897, applied Jefferson's philosophy on a grand scale and built the Library into a national institution. Spofford was responsible for the copyright law of 1870, which required all copyright applicants to send to the Library two copies of their work. This resulted in a flood of books, pamphlets, maps, music, prints, and photographs. Facing a shortage of shelf space at the Capitol, Spofford convinced Congress of the need for a new building, and in 1873 Congress authorized a competition to design plans for the new Library. In 1886, after many proposals and much controversy, Congress authorized construction of a new Library building in the style of the Italian Renaissance in accordance with a design prepared by Washington architects John L. Smithmeyer and Paul J. Pelz. The Congressional authorization was successful because of the hard work of two key Senators: Daniel W. Voorhees (Indiana), who served as chairman of the Joint Committee from 1879 to 1881, and Justin S. Morrill (Vermont), chairman of Senate Committee on Buildings and Grounds. In 1888, General Thomas Lincoln Casey, chief of the Army Corps of Engineers, was placed in charge of construction. His chief assistant was Bernard R. Green, who was intimately involved with the building until his death in 1914. Beginning in 1892, a new architect, Edward Pearce Casey, the son of General Casey, began to supervise the interior work, including sculptural and painted decoration by more than 50 American artists. When the Library of Congress building opened its doors to the public on November 1, 1897, it was hailed as a glorious national monument and "the largest, the costliest, and the safest" library building in the world.

Boards & Committees
Chair
1989 - Current
Non-Profit Donations & Grants

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$10K - $25K
2018
$10K - $25K
2017
$10K - $25K
2016
Political Donations Received
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