David A. Schulz

Floyd Abrams Clinical Lecturer in Law & Senior Research Scholar in Law at Yale University - Yale Law School

David A. Schulz

David A. Schulz

Floyd Abrams Clinical Lecturer in Law & Senior Research Scholar in Law at Yale University - Yale Law School

Biography

Floyd Abrams Clinical Lecturer, Senior Research Scholar and Co-director of the Media Freedom and Information Access Clinic at Yale Law School and Senior Counsel at Ballard Spahr, LLP. He defends the newsgathering activity and content of such news organizations as The New York Times, Associated Press, CBS, Hearst, Conde Nast, BuzzFeed, Gizmodo, and other media outlets. His Yale clinic provides pro bono legal services to defend the newsgathering rights of journalists and advocacy organizations. Schulz is ranked one of the top First Amendment Litigators in the country by Chambers USA. He earned his B.A. in mathematics and economics, M.A. in economics and J.D. at Yale University.

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478

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2

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President & Professor of Economics at Knox College

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Professor of the Practice at Duke University - Theatre Studies

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Head, Litigation Practice at Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP

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Former Chief Technology Officer at Genaissance Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

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Investment Advisor at Gofen & Glossberg LLC

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Head of Product & Relationship Management, Relationship Management at Mellon Investments Corp.

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Partner at Haynes and Boone LLP

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Chief Investment Officer at White Oak Partners Investment Advisor LLC

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Chair for Academic Affairs, Board of Trustees at Knox College

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Chair of Academic Affairs, Board of Trustees at Knox College

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David A. Schulz
Floyd Abrams Clinical Lecturer in Law & Senior Research Scholar in Law at Yale University - Yale Law School
Career History
Floyd Abrams Clinical Lecturer in Law & Senior Research Scholar in Law
Current

Located in New Haven, Connecticut, Yale Law School is one of the world’s premier law schools. It offers an unmatched environment of excellence and educational intimacy in the form of world renowned faculty, small classes, limitless opportunities for clinical training, and strong encouragement of public service. The Law School is small by design; its impact on the world is measured by its accomplished graduates and its ongoing scholarship and outreach through numerous centers and projects. For students, the experience is unparalleled. The faculty-student ratio supports a vast array of courses and opportunities for independent research and student-organized seminars. Students get practical training by representing real clients in clinics starting in their first year. Throughout, a spirit of collaboration reigns. All first-term courses are ungraded, and subsequent classes are graded honors/pass/low pass. Yale Law School is unique among law schools in that it produces leaders in all walks of life: distinguished deans and faculty members at law schools across the country and the world; industry CEOs and corporate counsels; founders of nongovernmental organizations and other nonprofit entities; entrepreneurs; government servants in federal, state, and local offices and the judiciary--just a few areas in which our alumni's talent and passion and dedication have made a difference. Among the School’s graduates are U.S. Presidents and Supreme Court Justices; and among its far-reaching projects, the Information Society Project and the China Center.

Boards & Committees
Board Member
Prior

The Association of the Bar of the City of New York is a voluntary association of lawyers and law students. The organization was founded in 1870 and it is headquartered in New York, NY.

Non-Profit Donations & Grants

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$10K - $25K
2018

Knox College was founded in 1837 by anti-slavery social reformers, led by George Washington Gale. Many of the founders, including the Rev. Samuel Wright, actively supported the Underground Railroad. The original name for the school was Knox Manual Labor College, but it has been known by its present name since 1857. The college's name came about through a compromise among its founders. Though founded by a colony of Presbyterians and Congregationalists, the county in which the college is located was already named Knox County, after Henry Knox, the first United States Secretary of War. Arguments have been made that the college was named for Calvinist leader John Knox, but it is not certain for which Knox it was named (if not both). George Candee Gale, a great-great-grandson of two of the founders, explains that "contrary to general belief, Knox was not named for either General Knox or the Scottish Presbyterian Knox, according to my father ... Some wanted the college named for one Knox, some for the other; so they compromised on KNOX. Certainly most of them were pious enough to want the churchman and fighters enough to want the soldier as well. Knox was the site of the fifth debate between Abraham Lincoln and Stephen A. Douglas in 1858. The Old Main building is the only site from the debates that stands today. Two years after the debates, and during his presidential campaign, Lincoln was awarded the first honorary doctorate ever conferred by Knox College—a Doctor of Laws degree, announced at the commencement exercises of 5 July 1860

$10K - $25K
2015

Knox College was founded in 1837 by anti-slavery social reformers, led by George Washington Gale. Many of the founders, including the Rev. Samuel Wright, actively supported the Underground Railroad. The original name for the school was Knox Manual Labor College, but it has been known by its present name since 1857. The college's name came about through a compromise among its founders. Though founded by a colony of Presbyterians and Congregationalists, the county in which the college is located was already named Knox County, after Henry Knox, the first United States Secretary of War. Arguments have been made that the college was named for Calvinist leader John Knox, but it is not certain for which Knox it was named (if not both). George Candee Gale, a great-great-grandson of two of the founders, explains that "contrary to general belief, Knox was not named for either General Knox or the Scottish Presbyterian Knox, according to my father ... Some wanted the college named for one Knox, some for the other; so they compromised on KNOX. Certainly most of them were pious enough to want the churchman and fighters enough to want the soldier as well. Knox was the site of the fifth debate between Abraham Lincoln and Stephen A. Douglas in 1858. The Old Main building is the only site from the debates that stands today. Two years after the debates, and during his presidential campaign, Lincoln was awarded the first honorary doctorate ever conferred by Knox College—a Doctor of Laws degree, announced at the commencement exercises of 5 July 1860

$25K - $50K
2013

Knox College was founded in 1837 by anti-slavery social reformers, led by George Washington Gale. Many of the founders, including the Rev. Samuel Wright, actively supported the Underground Railroad. The original name for the school was Knox Manual Labor College, but it has been known by its present name since 1857. The college's name came about through a compromise among its founders. Though founded by a colony of Presbyterians and Congregationalists, the county in which the college is located was already named Knox County, after Henry Knox, the first United States Secretary of War. Arguments have been made that the college was named for Calvinist leader John Knox, but it is not certain for which Knox it was named (if not both). George Candee Gale, a great-great-grandson of two of the founders, explains that "contrary to general belief, Knox was not named for either General Knox or the Scottish Presbyterian Knox, according to my father ... Some wanted the college named for one Knox, some for the other; so they compromised on KNOX. Certainly most of them were pious enough to want the churchman and fighters enough to want the soldier as well. Knox was the site of the fifth debate between Abraham Lincoln and Stephen A. Douglas in 1858. The Old Main building is the only site from the debates that stands today. Two years after the debates, and during his presidential campaign, Lincoln was awarded the first honorary doctorate ever conferred by Knox College—a Doctor of Laws degree, announced at the commencement exercises of 5 July 1860

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