James W. DeYoung

Former Vice Chairman at Chicago Botanic Garden

James W. DeYoung

James W. DeYoung

Former Vice Chairman at Chicago Botanic Garden

Biography

Mr. James W. DeYoung is on the Board of Directors at Rush University Medical Center, Skokie Hospital, and Chicago Botanic Garden.Mr. DeYoung also served on the board at TurboChef Technologies, Inc.He received his undergraduate degree from Northwestern University and a graduate degree from Washington & Lee University.

Overview
Career Highlights

Winston Partners Group LLC

RelSci Relationships

825

Number of Boards

5

Birthday

1944

Age

77

Relationships
RelSci Relationships are individuals James W. DeYoung likely has professional access to. A relationship does not necessarily indicate a personal connection.

Executive Vice President, Finance & Administration & Chief Financial Officer at Chicago Botanic Garden

Relationship likelihood: Strong

Director at Chicago Botanic Garden

Relationship likelihood: Strong

Former Vice Chairman at Chicago Botanic Garden

Relationship likelihood: Strong

Co-Founder at Catholic Investment Services, Inc.

Relationship likelihood: Strong

Director, Vice Chairman-Finance & Investment at Chicago Botanic Garden

Relationship likelihood: Strong

Former Vice Chairman at Chicago Botanic Garden

Relationship likelihood: Strong

Treasurer & Director at D and R Fund

Relationship likelihood: Strong

Former Vice Chairman at Chicago Botanic Garden

Relationship likelihood: Strong

Global Chair, Litigation Department at Reed Smith LLP

Relationship likelihood: Strong

Partner at Mayer Brown LLP

Relationship likelihood: Strong

Paths to James W. DeYoung
Potential Connections via
Relationship Science
You
James W. DeYoung
Former Vice Chairman at Chicago Botanic Garden
Education
BA

Founded in 1749, Washington and Lee University is named for two of the most influential men in American history: George Washington, whose generous endowment of $20,000 in 1796 helped the fledgling school (then known as Liberty Hall Academy) survive, and Robert E. Lee, whose presidency and innovative leadership brought the University into the national limelight. The University is located in the historic city of Lexington (population 7,000) in the Great Valley of Virginia about three hours southwest of Washington, D.C. W&L’s 35 principal buildings include the picturesque Washington College group forming the Colonnade facing Lee Chapel, where Robert E. Lee is buried. The Colonnade and Lee Chapel are National Historic Landmarks. New or recently renovated buildings include the John W. Elrod University Commons, the journalism department's Reid Hall, the Doremus fitness center and Wilson Hall, the fine arts and music center. Academic Divisions Washington and Lee is composed of two undergraduate divisions, the College and the Williams School of Commerce, Economics, and Politics; and a graduate School of Law. The undergraduate institution offers 40 majors, 20 minors and more than 1,100 courses—an enviable curriculum for a school of only 1,770 undergraduate students. W&L also features the only fully-accredited business school and fully-accredited journalism program among the nation's top-tier liberal arts colleges. The School of Law, one of the smallest nationally recognized legal programs in the country at about 400 students, has its own dean and faculty. It offers the Juris Doctor degree and, for international law graduates, the Master of Laws degree in United States Law. Faculty and Students As one of the nation's best teaching colleges, W&L places a high priority on recruiting and retaining a top-notch faculty. Virtually all of the University's professors hold the Ph.D. degree or equivalent earned doctoral degree, and all faculty members are active in continuing self-development as scholars and teachers. There are no teaching assistants. The average class size is 16 students, and nearly one-fourth of all classes have no more than 10 students. The student-to-faculty ratio is 9:1. W&L is also notable for its national and international student body. W&L's students live in 48 states and the District of Columbia and hold citizenships in 47 other countries. About 14 percent of undergraduates come from Virginia, with large numbers of students arriving from Maryland, Texas, Georgia, New York, Pennsylvania and California. Student Life Once on campus, W&L students are highly involved in student government, athletics and student activities. The University fields 24 NCAA Division III sports, including the 2007 national champions in women's tennis. Students can also participate in over 125 clubs and organizations, including a student newspaper, a broadcast radio station, and cable television station. Perhaps the most distinguishing characteristic of the University is its student run Honor System, and the environment that it creates on campus and in Lexington. Students at W&L enjoy unparalleled academic and social freedom. Undergraduates typically schedule their own final examinations, all students take their exams unsupervised, personal property is generally safe on campus, most University buildings remain open twenty-four hours per day, and a student’s word is accepted and respected both on campus and in the community. Since its inception, the Honor System has fostered a sense of community and trust that continues to enhance the lives of Washington and Lee students, during enrollment at Washington and Lee and in their later personal and professional lives.

JD

The Northwestern University School of Law is an elite, private American law school in Chicago, Illinois. Located in the North Side's Streeterville, it is one of the twelve constituent schools of Northwestern University. The law school was founded in 1859 as the Union College of Law of the Old University of Chicago. The first law school established in Chicago, it became jointly controlled by Northwestern University in 1873 and fully incorporated into Northwestern in 1891. Northwestern Law is a member of the "T-14" law schools, a prestigious group of 14 schools that have national recognition.

Career History
Vice Chairman
Current

The mission of the Chicago Botanic Garden is to promote the enjoyment, understanding, and conservation of plants and the natural world. The Garden continues to strive to meet the lofty goals set more than a century ago. The Chicago Botanic Garden, with its world-renowned plant collections and displays, is one of the country's most visited public gardens and a preeminent center for learning and scientific research. The 385-acre Garden features 26 display gardens and four natural areas, uniquely situated on nine islands surrounded by lakes. HISTORY The Chicago Horticultural Society was founded in 1890. At its heart was the understanding that the city of Chicago was incorporated with the Latin words Urbs in Horto, meaning "city in a garden." The Society hosted nationally recognized flower and horticultural shows from its beginning. Information on the first show the new Society hosted is lost to history, but records archived at the Chicago Botanic Garden confirm the second show was held in the autumn of 1892 at the Regiment Armory, possibly at 1542 South Michigan Avenue, where a new armory opened in 1890. With two successful annual shows behind them, the Society next hosted the World’s Columbian Exposition Chrysanthemum Show, held in conjunction with the world’s fair in the autumn of 1893, at the newly built and just-opened Art Institute of Chicago. After a period of inactivity, the Chicago Horticultural Society was restarted in 1943. In 1962, modern history begins when the Society agreed to help create and manage a new public garden. With the groundbreaking for the Garden in 1965 and its opening in 1972, the Society created a permanent site on which to carry out its mission. The mission encompasses three important components: collections, education, and research. In 2012, the Chicago Botanic Garden celebrated its 40th anniversary. In looking back over the Garden's growth since 1972, Garden staff, members, and visitors could appreciate the remarkable changes that had taken place. The 40th anniversary website included a timeline of significant events, historical photos, and opportunities for community members to share their experiences at the Garden

Founder
1984 - ?

Winston Partners Group specializes in managing multi-manager long/short equity fund portfolios focused on fundamental, research-driven investment strategies. The firm manages three different geographic strategies: US Global, and Asia. They invest in a diversified group of long/short equity hedge fund managers that they believe is balanced across investment styles, sector orientations, geographic regions, and market capitalizations. Winston Partners Group seeks to achieve equity-like long-term returns with significantly lower volatility and beta than the broad market indices and to reduce the loss of capital during challenging equity market environments. Their investment and operational due diligence teams conduct deep, thorough due diligence to hire managers who employ a bottom-up approach to equity investing.

Professional
Prior

Baxter International Inc. (NYSE:BAX), through its subsidiaries, develops, manufactures and markets products that save and sustain the lives of people with hemophilia, immune disorders, infectious diseases, kidney disease, trauma, and other chronic and acute medical conditions. As a global, diversified healthcare company, Baxter applies a unique combination of expertise in medical devices, pharmaceuticals and biotechnology to create products that advance patient care worldwide. Baxter had 2011 sales of $13.9 billion and has approximately 48,500 employees.

Boards & Committees
Director
2003 - 2009

The Group's principal activities are to design, develop and market proprietary cooking systems. These technologies provide foodservice operators the flexibility to cook-to-order a variety of foods items at speed, which are faster than those permitted by conventional commercial ovens. The proprietary systems include TurboCom, a centralized cook setting system, which, through the use of a computer modem, can reprogram TurboChef ovens installed in various restaurant locations from a single central site. Commercial cooking systems are marketed under the name of TurboChef, TornadoT82, a food preparation management system, which can be incorporated into a restaurant's existing electronic order processing system, sort the items to be cooked by required cook times, and indicate, on real-time basis, when such food items are to be inserted into TurboChef oven.

Member, Board of Observers
Current

Rush University is a comprehensive, but small medical school and research institution in Chicago, Illinois. Rush University's educational programs encompass a wide range of medical and healthcare fields. Students may obtain a bachelor's or master's degree in a specialized healthcare field like: * Respiratory care * Speech-language pathology * Perfusion technology * Occupational therapy * Pharmacology Rush University also houses a medical school that trains future doctors. They also offer doctorates in such specific fields as: * Audiology * Neurology * Nursing As part of their training, those in-clinical training programs undertake clinical rotations at the school's medical center. Rush offers a number of research-oriented degrees and programs, as well. These include master's and doctoral programs in: * Biochemistry * Biotechnology * Biophysics * Immunology Rush's admissions policies vary, depending on the degree and field of study. Applicants to all nursing programs must have a GPA of at least 3.0. Those whose GPA is 3.25 or higher do not need to take the GRE. An interview and courses in the sciences are also required of nursing applicants. Rush University offers scholarships to qualifying nursing students. Nursing and other students may also apply for federal grants or loans. To apply for these, applicants must submit a FAFSA.

Non-Profit Donations & Grants

Learn how non-profit organizations benefit from RelSci
$50K - $100K
2018

The mission of the Chicago Botanic Garden is to promote the enjoyment, understanding, and conservation of plants and the natural world. The Garden continues to strive to meet the lofty goals set more than a century ago. The Chicago Botanic Garden, with its world-renowned plant collections and displays, is one of the country's most visited public gardens and a preeminent center for learning and scientific research. The 385-acre Garden features 26 display gardens and four natural areas, uniquely situated on nine islands surrounded by lakes. HISTORY The Chicago Horticultural Society was founded in 1890. At its heart was the understanding that the city of Chicago was incorporated with the Latin words Urbs in Horto, meaning "city in a garden." The Society hosted nationally recognized flower and horticultural shows from its beginning. Information on the first show the new Society hosted is lost to history, but records archived at the Chicago Botanic Garden confirm the second show was held in the autumn of 1892 at the Regiment Armory, possibly at 1542 South Michigan Avenue, where a new armory opened in 1890. With two successful annual shows behind them, the Society next hosted the World’s Columbian Exposition Chrysanthemum Show, held in conjunction with the world’s fair in the autumn of 1893, at the newly built and just-opened Art Institute of Chicago. After a period of inactivity, the Chicago Horticultural Society was restarted in 1943. In 1962, modern history begins when the Society agreed to help create and manage a new public garden. With the groundbreaking for the Garden in 1965 and its opening in 1972, the Society created a permanent site on which to carry out its mission. The mission encompasses three important components: collections, education, and research. In 2012, the Chicago Botanic Garden celebrated its 40th anniversary. In looking back over the Garden's growth since 1972, Garden staff, members, and visitors could appreciate the remarkable changes that had taken place. The 40th anniversary website included a timeline of significant events, historical photos, and opportunities for community members to share their experiences at the Garden

$25K - $50K
2017

The mission of the Chicago Botanic Garden is to promote the enjoyment, understanding, and conservation of plants and the natural world. The Garden continues to strive to meet the lofty goals set more than a century ago. The Chicago Botanic Garden, with its world-renowned plant collections and displays, is one of the country's most visited public gardens and a preeminent center for learning and scientific research. The 385-acre Garden features 26 display gardens and four natural areas, uniquely situated on nine islands surrounded by lakes. HISTORY The Chicago Horticultural Society was founded in 1890. At its heart was the understanding that the city of Chicago was incorporated with the Latin words Urbs in Horto, meaning "city in a garden." The Society hosted nationally recognized flower and horticultural shows from its beginning. Information on the first show the new Society hosted is lost to history, but records archived at the Chicago Botanic Garden confirm the second show was held in the autumn of 1892 at the Regiment Armory, possibly at 1542 South Michigan Avenue, where a new armory opened in 1890. With two successful annual shows behind them, the Society next hosted the World’s Columbian Exposition Chrysanthemum Show, held in conjunction with the world’s fair in the autumn of 1893, at the newly built and just-opened Art Institute of Chicago. After a period of inactivity, the Chicago Horticultural Society was restarted in 1943. In 1962, modern history begins when the Society agreed to help create and manage a new public garden. With the groundbreaking for the Garden in 1965 and its opening in 1972, the Society created a permanent site on which to carry out its mission. The mission encompasses three important components: collections, education, and research. In 2012, the Chicago Botanic Garden celebrated its 40th anniversary. In looking back over the Garden's growth since 1972, Garden staff, members, and visitors could appreciate the remarkable changes that had taken place. The 40th anniversary website included a timeline of significant events, historical photos, and opportunities for community members to share their experiences at the Garden

$10K - $25K
2016

The mission of the Chicago Botanic Garden is to promote the enjoyment, understanding, and conservation of plants and the natural world. The Garden continues to strive to meet the lofty goals set more than a century ago. The Chicago Botanic Garden, with its world-renowned plant collections and displays, is one of the country's most visited public gardens and a preeminent center for learning and scientific research. The 385-acre Garden features 26 display gardens and four natural areas, uniquely situated on nine islands surrounded by lakes. HISTORY The Chicago Horticultural Society was founded in 1890. At its heart was the understanding that the city of Chicago was incorporated with the Latin words Urbs in Horto, meaning "city in a garden." The Society hosted nationally recognized flower and horticultural shows from its beginning. Information on the first show the new Society hosted is lost to history, but records archived at the Chicago Botanic Garden confirm the second show was held in the autumn of 1892 at the Regiment Armory, possibly at 1542 South Michigan Avenue, where a new armory opened in 1890. With two successful annual shows behind them, the Society next hosted the World’s Columbian Exposition Chrysanthemum Show, held in conjunction with the world’s fair in the autumn of 1893, at the newly built and just-opened Art Institute of Chicago. After a period of inactivity, the Chicago Horticultural Society was restarted in 1943. In 1962, modern history begins when the Society agreed to help create and manage a new public garden. With the groundbreaking for the Garden in 1965 and its opening in 1972, the Society created a permanent site on which to carry out its mission. The mission encompasses three important components: collections, education, and research. In 2012, the Chicago Botanic Garden celebrated its 40th anniversary. In looking back over the Garden's growth since 1972, Garden staff, members, and visitors could appreciate the remarkable changes that had taken place. The 40th anniversary website included a timeline of significant events, historical photos, and opportunities for community members to share their experiences at the Garden

Political Donations
$250
2004

Representative from the 97th District at Illinois House of Representatives

$1,000
1999

Former President of United States

$1,000
1994

Representative from Tennessee's 5th Congressional District

This web site is not endorsed by, directly affiliated with, maintained, authorized, or sponsored by James W. DeYoung. The use of any trade name or trademark is for identification and reference purposes only and does not imply any association with the trademark holder. The Presence of James W. DeYoung's profile does not indicate a business or promotional relationship of any kind between RelSci and James W. DeYoung.