Keri Stalker

Assistant Director at The Broad Institute, Inc.

Keri Stalker

Keri Stalker

Assistant Director at The Broad Institute, Inc.

Biography

Keri Stalker is assistant director for the Broad Institute. In this role, she oversees the operations of the institute’s governance and top-level management structures. She works closely with the Board of Directors and senior leadership to coordinate their efforts and address a variety of institutional issues.

Keri worked at the Whitehead Institute/MIT Center for Genome Research, now part of the Broad Institute, from 1995 – 1999 managing a range of laboratory activities associated with the Human Genome Project. She later served as manager of genotyping processes for Cereon Genomics, a subsidiary of Monsanto focused on agricultural genomics. In 2003, she returned to the Broad Institute to help manage the institute’s Microbial Sequencing Center, a $75M center funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases to understand the genomes of organisms considered agents of emerging infectious disease and bioterrorism.

Keri received her M.B.A. from Harvard Business School and her B.A. from Wellesley College.

Overview
RelSci Relationships

204

Number of Boards

1

Relationships
RelSci Relationships are individuals Keri Stalker likely has professional access to. A relationship does not necessarily indicate a personal connection.

Senior Director, Genomics Platform at The Broad Institute, Inc.

Relationship likelihood: Strong

Director, Sponsored Research & Planning at The Broad Institute, Inc.

Relationship likelihood: Strong

Director, Genomic Sequencing Center for Infectious Diseases at The Broad Institute, Inc.

Relationship likelihood: Strong

Member, Editorial Board at CBE - Life Sciences Education

Relationship likelihood: Strong

Former Chief Financial Officer at The Broad Institute, Inc.

Relationship likelihood: Strong

Executive Director, Center for the Science of Therapeutics at The Broad Institute, Inc.

Relationship likelihood: Strong

President at The Broad Institute, Inc.

Relationship likelihood: Strong

Co-Founder at FORMA Therapeutics, Inc.

Relationship likelihood: Strong

Senior Scientific Advisor at Clarus Ventures LLC

Relationship likelihood: Strong

Director-Stanley Center Psychiatric Research at Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Relationship likelihood: Strong

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Keri Stalker
Assistant Director at The Broad Institute, Inc.
Education
MBA

Harvard Business School (HBS) is the graduate business school of Harvard University in Boston, Massachusetts, United States. The school offers a large full-time MBA program, doctoral programs, and many executive education programs. It owns Harvard Business School Publishing, which publishes business books, leadership articles, online management tools for corporate learning, case studies, and the monthly Harvard Business Review.

BA

Wellesley is known for the excellence of its education, the beauty of its setting, its gifted faculty, and the uniqueness of its campus culture. But most of all, Wellesley is known for the thousands of accomplished, thoughtful women it has sent out into the world for over 100 years—women who are committed to making a difference. A Transformative Educational Experience Every year, some 2,400 of the world’s top undergraduate women are challenged to exceed their own highest personal and intellectual expectations. The mastery Wellesley graduates demonstrate across the professional and vocational spectrum, and the influence they wield—whether in their own communities or on the world stage—is testament to a singularly empowering undergraduate experience. Wellesley’s lively academic community places a high value on rigorous, probing inquiry, and creative, cross-discipline thinking. Its collaborative approach to scholarship encourages students to question, debate, and refine their points of view, not only with each other, but with our world-class faculty—often by working directly with them on groundbreaking projects. A Wellesley education fosters the highest standard of readiness for the “real world” in its graduates, in terms of ability to think, act, and contribute meaningfully and effectively in their chosen areas of interest. The “Full-Engagement” Advantage Wellesley’s full-engagement academic philosophy extends to the running of the College itself. The student voice is central to decision-making here; students serve on major committees of the Board of Trustees, participate in faculty search, and contribute to strategic planning. Students participate in a wide range of extracurricular projects: The College and its surrounding community and the greater Boston area offer hundreds of internships, advocacy projects, and the rare advantages of being a vital member of the single largest academic “hotspot” in the country. Expected to be fully engaged while at Wellesley, students carry this sense of purposeful involvement and personal commitment throughout life. It is the signal mark of a Wellesley woman. A Widely Envied Campus Environment The sheer sense of scale of the breathtaking natural environment, in which buildings are thoughtfully sited, distinguish Wellesley’s physical setting in the classically New England town of Wellesley, Massachusetts, just outside of Boston. Home to leading institutions such as the Albright Institute, the Knapp Social Science Center, the Davis Museum, The Newhouse Center for the Humanities, and the world-renowned Wellesley Centers for Women, Wellesley’s resources are a magnet not only for the surrounding community and metropolitan area; they attract attention—and scholars—from around the world. Commitment to Women Everything about Wellesley College bespeaks its commitment to women, and to providing them with an unexcelled educational experience that honors and cultivates not only what is best about each of them, and their own potential, but about what women offer our world.

Career History
Assistant Director
Current

The Broad Institute evolved from a decade of informal and successful research collaborations among scientists in the MIT and Harvard communities. In 1990, the Whitehead Institute/MIT Center for Genome Research (WICGR) was founded, and it soon became an international leader in the field of genomics and a flagship of the Human Genome Project. As early as 1995, WICGR scientists recognized the need to bring the power of genomics to the understanding of human disease. It launched pilot projects in genomic medicine, forming an unofficial collaborative network among scientists from across MIT and Harvard who pioneered new approaches to cancer and human genetics. In parallel, Harvard Medical School-based scientists established the Institute of Chemistry and Cell Biology (ICCB) in 1998, to facilitate the pursuit of chemical genetics as an academic discipline and a tool to further understand human biology and disease. In 2002, the ICCB was awarded an Initiative for Chemical Genetics (ICG) grant from the National Cancer Institute, and its successful Investigator-Initiated Screening Program facilitated small molecule screening projects for more than 80 research groups worldwide. These projects demonstrated the power of enabling scientists to collaborate to tackle the major challenges in molecular medicine. It was clear that a new type of formal organization was required — open, collaborative, interdisciplinary, and able to organize projects at any scale. In addition, it was important that the complementary expertise of the genomic scientists and the chemical biologists across MIT and Harvard be brought together in one place to drive the transformation of medicine with molecular knowledge. Discussions in 2002-2003 among Eli and Edythe Broad, MIT, Harvard and its affiliated hospitals, and the Whitehead Institute shaped the vision for this new institute. The extraordinary generosity of Eli and Edythe Broad, through their founding gift of $100 million (later doubled to $200 million) made it possible to formally announce the new institute in June 2003 and to launch it in May 2004. Less than four years after its launch, the Broads gave an unprecedented gift of $400 million in September 2008 to permanently endow the institute, providing long-term sustainability for its unique model of collaborative, inter-institutional research.

Manager, Genotyping Processes
Prior
Boards & Committees
Member, Management Committee
Current

The Broad Institute evolved from a decade of informal and successful research collaborations among scientists in the MIT and Harvard communities. In 1990, the Whitehead Institute/MIT Center for Genome Research (WICGR) was founded, and it soon became an international leader in the field of genomics and a flagship of the Human Genome Project. As early as 1995, WICGR scientists recognized the need to bring the power of genomics to the understanding of human disease. It launched pilot projects in genomic medicine, forming an unofficial collaborative network among scientists from across MIT and Harvard who pioneered new approaches to cancer and human genetics. In parallel, Harvard Medical School-based scientists established the Institute of Chemistry and Cell Biology (ICCB) in 1998, to facilitate the pursuit of chemical genetics as an academic discipline and a tool to further understand human biology and disease. In 2002, the ICCB was awarded an Initiative for Chemical Genetics (ICG) grant from the National Cancer Institute, and its successful Investigator-Initiated Screening Program facilitated small molecule screening projects for more than 80 research groups worldwide. These projects demonstrated the power of enabling scientists to collaborate to tackle the major challenges in molecular medicine. It was clear that a new type of formal organization was required — open, collaborative, interdisciplinary, and able to organize projects at any scale. In addition, it was important that the complementary expertise of the genomic scientists and the chemical biologists across MIT and Harvard be brought together in one place to drive the transformation of medicine with molecular knowledge. Discussions in 2002-2003 among Eli and Edythe Broad, MIT, Harvard and its affiliated hospitals, and the Whitehead Institute shaped the vision for this new institute. The extraordinary generosity of Eli and Edythe Broad, through their founding gift of $100 million (later doubled to $200 million) made it possible to formally announce the new institute in June 2003 and to launch it in May 2004. Less than four years after its launch, the Broads gave an unprecedented gift of $400 million in September 2008 to permanently endow the institute, providing long-term sustainability for its unique model of collaborative, inter-institutional research.

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